Kalugu

Insight into South Asia

Nuclear Power Up-rate will aid growth to world Power generation

As the global economic slow down hist hard on several sectors of the once thriving power industry, the utilities segment is now striving to find innovative ways to enhance their plants operating capacity. Several US based nuclear plants are in the process of modifying their existing fleet to achieve enahnced output. This may turn out to be a boon for South Asia and other similar the power hungry plants wordlwide.
Power up-rate in simple terms is the process of increasing the power output of a running plant by enabling modification to existing components. Since up-rate of existing plants require less investment & little down time, many more utilities are submitting their desire to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, USA). When the NRC issues a license for a commercial nuclear power plant, the agency sets limits on the maximum heat output, or power level, for the reactor core. This power level dictates a significant role in many of the analyses that demonstrate plant safety, so the NRC’s authorization is required before a plant can change its maximum power level. Power up-rate only occurs after the NRC approves a commercial nuclear power plant’s request to augment its power.
To increase the power output of a reactor, more highly enriched uranium fuel and/or more fresh fuel is required. This enables the reactor to produce extra thermal (Heat) energy and therefore additional steam, driving a turbine generator to produce more electricity.
Types of Power Up-rates:
The design of every commercial reactor has excess capacity needed to potentially allow for an up-rate, which can fall into one of three categories:
a) Measurement uncertainty recapture power up-rates
b) Stretch power up-rates
c) Extended power up-rates.
a) Measurement uncertainty recapture {MUR} power up-rates are power increases less than 2 % of the approved power level, and are achieved by implementing superior techniques for calculating reactor power. This involves the use of high-tech devices to more accurately measure feed water flow which is used to calculate reactor power.
b) Stretch power up-rates {SPU} are classically between 2 % and 7 %, with the actual increase in power depending on a plant design’s specific operating margin. These involve, modest equipment replacement and little or no change to either the nuclear steam supply system {Reactor – Boiler} or turbine by limiting increase in pressure (2% to 3%) to allow sufficient mass flow margin in the high-pressure {HP} turbine. Stretch power up-rates usually involve changes to instrumentation settings but do not involve major plant modifications.
c) Extended power up-rates are greater than stretch power up-rates and EPU increases the original licensed thermal power output by up to 20%. Extended power up-rates usually require significant modifications to major pieces of non-nuclear equipment such as high-pressure turbines, Feed water heaters, condensate extraction pumps, Drain pumps, Feed pumps and motors, main generators, and/or transformers.
Expected Applications for Power Up-rates:
The following information is based on the October 2008 survey of NRC licensees. Survey indicate utilities plan to submit 42 power up-rate applications in the next five years, including 21 extended power up-rates, 1 stretch power up-rates and 20 measurement uncertainty recapture up-rates. If these applications are permitted, the resulting up-rates would add another 8,683 MWt (2,894 MWe) to America’s power generating capacity.
Many Economic Returns:
There are also other benefits associated with an up-rate. Many of the existing nuclear plants have been operating for 30 years or more and require some kind of retrofits and modifications on major equipments. These and other potential plants have either completed or looking for a license renewal. Combining an up-rate with a maintenance upgrade or license extension allows some of the cost to be shared among these programs. Also utility doesn’t have to wait as long to collect the benefits of an EPU (Extended Power Uprate). An EPU can be brought into operation in about half the time required to license and build a new plant.
More than Replacing Components:
The success of an EPU program heavily relies on the quality of the management team, their ability to develop an effective execution plan, to schedule the work efficiently and to build valuable controls to ensure that those schedules are carried out.
It is difficult to generalize the perfect plan to complete an EPU for a given plant. Difference between previous modifications and equipment change outs to maintain plant operation all combine to make the EPU program for each nuclear plant unique.
With coal, oil and gas-fired power plants increasing coming under criticism for damaging the environment, Nuclear energy will pave the way to an important electric power generation platform for the future.

As the global economic slow down hits hard on several sectors of the once thriving power industry, the utilities segment is now striving to find innovative ways to enhance their plants operating capacity. Several US based nuclear plants are in the process of modifying their existing fleet to achieve enhanced output. While these initiatives will increase USA’s power output, can very well be implemented in South Asia to deliver similar results. The knowledge on these procedures can be valuable for all power plants across the globe.

Power up-rate in simple terms is the process of increasing the power output of a running plant by enabling modification to existing components. Since up-rate of existing plants require less investment & little down time, many more utilities are submitting their desire to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, USA). When the NRC issues a license for a commercial nuclear power plant, the agency sets limits on the maximum heat output, or power level, for the reactor core. This power level dictates a significant role in many of the analyses that demonstrate plant safety, so the NRC’s authorization is required before a plant can change its maximum power level. Power up-rate only occurs after the NRC approves a commercial nuclear power plant’s request to augment its power.

The Beaver Valley nuclear power plant, USA. Almost half of American reactors have undergone  maintenance to boost performance, often carried out alongside work to extend the reactors working lives.

The Beaver Valley nuclear power plant, USA. Almost half of American reactors have undergone maintenance to boost performance, often carried out alongside work to extend the reactors' working lives.

To increase the power output of a reactor, more highly enriched uranium fuel and/or more fresh fuel is required. This enables the reactor to produce extra thermal (Heat) energy and therefore additional steam, driving a turbine generator to produce more electricity.

Types of Power Up-rates:

The design of every commercial reactor has excess capacity needed to potentially allow for an up-rate, which can fall into one of three categories:

a) Measurement uncertainty recapture power up-rates

b) Stretch power up-rates

c) Extended power up-rates.

a) Measurement uncertainty recapture {MUR} power up-rates are power increases less than 2 % of the approved power level, and are achieved by implementing superior techniques for calculating reactor power. This involves the use of high-tech devices to more accurately measure feed water flow which is used to calculate reactor power.

b) Stretch power up-rates {SPU} are classically between 2 % and 7 %, with the actual increase in power depending on a plant designs specific operating margin. These involve, modest equipment replacement and little or no change to either the nuclear steam supply system {Reactor – Boiler} or turbine by limiting increase in pressure (2% to 3%) to allow sufficient mass flow margin in the high-pressure {HP} turbine. Stretch power up-rates usually involve changes to instrumentation settings but do not involve major plant modifications.

c) Extended power up-rates are greater than stretch power up-rates and EPU (Extended Power Uprate) increases the original licensed thermal power output by up to 20%. Extended power up-rates usually require significant modifications to major pieces of non-nuclear equipment such as high-pressure turbines, Feed water heaters, condensate extraction pumps, Drain pumps, Feed pumps and motors, main generators, and/or transformers.

Expected Applications for Power Up-rates:

The following information is based on the October 2008 survey of NRC licensees. Survey indicate utilities plan to submit 42 power up-rate applications in the next five years, including 21 extended power up-rates, 1 stretch power up-rates and 20 measurement uncertainty recapture up-rates. If these applications are permitted, the resulting up-rates would add another 8,683 MWt (2,894 MWe) to America’s power generating capacity.

Many Economic Returns:

There are also other benefits associated with an up-rate. Many of the existing nuclear plants have been operating for 30 years or more and require some kind of retrofits and modifications on major equipments. These and other potential plants have either completed or looking for a license renewal. Combining an up-rate with a maintenance upgrade or license extension allows some of the cost to be shared among these programs. Also utility doesn’t have to wait as long to collect the benefits of an EPU. An EPU can be brought into operation in about half the time required to license and build a new plant.

More than Replacing Components:

The success of an EPU program heavily relies on the quality of the management team, their ability to develop an effective execution plan, to schedule the work efficiently and to build valuable controls to ensure that those schedules are carried out.

It is difficult to generalize the perfect plan to complete an EPU for a given plant. Difference between previous modifications and equipment change outs to maintain plant operation all combine to make the EPU program for each nuclear plant unique.

With coal, oil and gas-fired power plants increasingly coming under criticism for damaging the environment, Nuclear energy is poised to pave the way for an important electric power generation platform for the future.

Written by Kandhan

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Filed under: Business & Economy, Science & Technology, , , , , , , ,

Sanitary napkins for poor women

Indian invention reaches poor African women

Anyone watching feminine hygiene advertising of various brands of sanitary napkins for women is led to believe that only their product can provide comfortable and carefree life for women on those three days. The concepts of such advertisements are designed to target women in all walks of life, making all kinds of claims, say a dancer can dance, an executive can work, a sportswoman can ride a bicycle or so, as if they are normal on those days. The advertisements go far in to the psychology of women and even instil fear about illness if they do not use their products.

We should be only happy that women feel good by using these products, but we are concerned about the exorbitant price of the napkins which prohibits the poor woman from buying and using the napkins. Is it fair to allow such discrimination? Only rich and middle class women could afford to buy those MNC products to tide over those three days of their natural menstruation cycle comfortably; The poor woman were using old cotton cloth etc, which caused many health hazards.

The MNCs always try to manufacture and sell any product which is essentially used by each person or family in any country. Such product shall be in a constant or increasing demand. That is the expanse of a global market. By this way the MNCs spread their wings in all countries, grow making manifold profit beyond a reasonable margin to become rich and rich. But the fair minded persons express their concern about commercialization of the Food including water and Medicines including the sanitary products which are essential for up keeping of a healthy and clean human body. Certain items in this category are beyond the reach of the poor.

And the good news now is that poor woman all over the world can buy and use sanitary napkins at an affordable price.

How is it possible?

Let us go back by two years to villages in Tamil nadu

A school dropout from Coimbatore, Arunachalam Muruganandam ( 43) invented a sanitary napkin machine which could produce 1000 pieces of napkins in just eight hours at a cost of Rs.1.00 per piece. This machine was priced at Rs.85,000/-only. The napkin produced by this machine was not only inexpensive but also environment-friendly and hygienic. This machine has got the potential of marginalising the MNCs who manufacture sanitary napkins and is about to force them to reduce the prices of their products.

Mini Sanitary napkin machine

Mini Sanitary napkin machine.

Several women Self Help Groups ( SHG) promoted by the Government of Tamil nadu and the Nationalised banks acquired this mini sanirtary napkin machine and started manufacturing the napkins to sell at a price of just Rs.2.00 per napkin in rural areas. A rural entrepreneur from Ramanathapuram reported that the SHG of three women employed six more women to run a sanitary napkin machine could earn a profit of Rs.20,000 per month.

In a remote village Mekala Chinnampally in Krishnagiri District, the poor Girl students used double inner wear or cloth to keep away stains since they could not buy sanitary napkins. More students preferred to stay away from schools in those days.
The authorities of District administration came with an idea of installing napkin vending machine inside the toilet of the Government school. The vending machine cost only Rs.8000/- and a low cost incinerator Rs.1500/- The sanitary napkins would be made available at a low cost by the self help groups who produced napkins using the mini napkin machine.

“The response of the students has been positive, Several remote village schools where girls haven’t even seen a sanitary napkin will now have a vending machine and most importantly, don’t have to bunk class,” said Ganesh Murthy, UNICEF consultant. About 570 teachers in the district have been trained to introduce children to sanitary napkins. “The UNICEF and the state government have broken the stigma surrounding female hygiene.”

In rural areas which are yet to transform to modernity owing to cultural liabilities, the girl students even hesitate to talk about their inconvenience and are shy of visiting a pharmacy or shop to ask for a napkin. Such difficulty is now removed as we hear a student saying “Before the napkin vending machine was set up in our school, we used to be very worried while coming to school, as we were using clothes before being introduced to sanitary napkins. We are required to put in two rupees into the machine and it returns a napkin. Our teachers taught us how to use them. We also have a place where we can burn the used napkins ( the incinerator) ”

That is the success story reported two years back.

And Now?

Professor Thomas M. Stove of the famous Massachusetts Institute of Technology ( MIT), Mechanical department, after learning the success story of the invention by Muruganandam and the widespread use of this machine in India enhancing rural hygiene has arranged for a contract between MIT and Muruganandam for buying the machine. The shipment of his sanitary napkin machines is to begin shortly.

Muruganandam says “Rather than giving cash and product grants, the MIT plans to supply my machines to several poor African states so that the women there will start using this inexpensive hygienic napkin. The initiative will also spawn several women’s self-help groups (SHGs) making decent profits by running these machines,”

Kalugu.com showers heartfelt appreciation for the inventor Muruganandam, the Government authorities, the self help groups, UNICEF and MIT for their concern, particularly to Mr. Muruganandam for his idea making a global impact. The achievement of Muruganandam shall be considered less if it is mere an invention, it is great if it is looked at as a social service benefitting millions of poor women around the world.

goal6_act

The world will flock around one
devoted to honest social service

( ThiruValluvar 1025)

Written by Malarthamil

Malarthamil is a civil engineer and writer-poet inspired by Thirukkural – a classical Tamil poetry that expounds various aspects of life.

Filed under: Business & Economy, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Google Larry Page’s University of Michigan Commencement Address

It is not easy to give a commencement speech.  ie, a really useful & inspirational speech that penetrates the ears of the intelligent crowd.  But some deliver such speeches.  The above is one such commencement speech delivered to 2009 graduates, by Google co-founder Larry Page.  It has romance, compassion, perseverance, love, family, dreams, history, humor… All in all, a nice story.  Lend your ears, for a precious 15 minutes of your lives.

My father’s father worked in the Chevy plant in Flint, Michigan. He was an assembly line worker. He drove his two children here to Ann Arbor, and told them: That is where you’re going to go to college. Both his kids did graduate from Michigan. That was the American dream.

Assembly line workers, all over the world, across races, across cultures, they all want to give their kids the best educational opportunity.  They believe in themselves, they believe in their kids.  They work hard, and they have high aspirations.  They would succeed.  ie, If others in the society too have a strong conviction that ‘All men are born equal’, then the factory workers would succeed.

The optimism of youth is often underrated!

You know what it’s like to wake up in the middle of the night with a vivid dream? And you know how, if you don’t have a pencil and pad by the bed to write it down, it will be completely gone the next morning?

Well, I had one of those dreams when I was 23. When I suddenly woke up, I was thinking: what if we could download the whole web, and just keep the links and… I grabbed a pen and started writing! Sometimes it is important to wake up and stop dreaming. I spent the middle of that night scribbling out the details and convincing myself it would work. Soon after, I told my advisor, Terry Winograd, it would take a couple of weeks to download the web — he nodded knowingly, fully aware it would take much longer but wise enough to not tell me. The optimism of youth is often underrated! Amazingly, I had no thought of building a search engine. The idea wasn’t even on the radar. But, much later we happened upon a better way of ranking webpages to make a really great search engine, and Google was born. When a really great dream shows up, grab it!

We are spreading the virus with every footstep, right under beautiful kids playing everywhere.

In late March 1996, soon after I had moved to Stanford for grad school, my Dad had difficultly breathing and drove to the hospital. Two months later, he died. And that was it. I was completely devastated. Many years later, after a startup, after falling in love, and after so many of life’s adventures, I found myself thinking about my Dad. Lucy and I were far away in a steaming hot village walking through narrow streets. There were wonderful friendly people everywhere, but it was a desperately poor place — people used the bathroom inside and it flowed out into the open gutter and straight into the river. We touched a boy with a limp leg, the result of paralysis from polio. Lucy and I were in rural India — one of the few places where Polio still exists. Polio is transmitted fecal to oral, usually through filthy water. Well, my Dad had Polio. […] He would have been very upset that Polio still persists even though we have a vaccine. He would have been equally upset that back in India we had polio virus on our shoes from walking through the contaminated gutters that spread the disease. We were spreading the virus with every footstep, right under beautiful kids playing everywhere. The world is on the verge of eliminating polio, with 328 people infected so far this year. Let’s get it done soon. Perhaps one of you will do that.

-vikadakavi

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The Pirates of Somalia and the MNC Robbers

If you have to turn the whole world towards you, you don’t have to hit at the governments or the armies. Hit at the most powerful Multi-National Company. The whole world will look at you. This is not my theory, but that’s the reality in this capitalist world.

For the past few weeks, the news headlines were dominated by the pirates of Somalia. Stories were flooding in the Television channels, newspapers and websites about the Pirates menace. US Navy, European Navies and even the Indian Navy are fighting out the pirates in the Gulf of Aden – one of the important trade route between Asia and Europe.

India, which could not save its own fishermen from the Sri Lankan Navy in the Gulf of Manner near Tamil Nadu’s coastline, is fighting out the pirates in the Gulf of Aden thousands of miles away from its coastline. When hundreds of Tamil Nadu Fishermen perished at the hands of the encroaching SriLankan Navy, India turned a blind eye towards the problem. But it was quick to fix the problem of its elite business class.

“One man’s pirate is another man’s coast guard” Says K’naan, Somali-Canadian singer and activist in the Huffington Post.

His article clearly exposes the double standards of the Western Media and the governments when it comes to their claim as who is victim. No matter what, It’s always the west who are victims. But K’naan exposes the actual victims.  It’s none other than the Somalian people. In his article K’naan exposes the exploitation of the Somali waters by the MNC companies. Western companies have dumped their wastes in Somalia’s water. The Multi-National companies exploitation of the Somalian waters and its impact on the people’s health has been explained by K’naan. The people of Somalia see the pirates as their Coast Guards who rob the vessels which dump their wastes thus preventing the exploitation of Somalian natural resources.

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Africa is a land known for its rich natural resources. From bio resources to minerals and oil –  it’s a land of richness. But contrary to its richness, it is also a land of poverty. The natural resources are meant for the people. People over the ages have lived with the help of these natural resources.

But since the advent of imperialism, western multinational companies have exploited the African continent and they gave back nothing but misery to the African people. Africans were victimized by these multi national companies. For decades the African continent has become the exploitation field of the western capitalists. Given the state of African countries lawlessness due to various civil wars and corrupt governments, the western multi national companies have been able to exploit the African resources without much of the world paying any attention.

Western pharmaceutical companies are the leaders in this game. They exploited the rich natural bio resources of the African continent. Not only just exploitation, these multinational drug companies patented their drugs which were unaffordable by the African people. Drugs made using the African raw materials were beyond the purchasing power of the African people. Such is the tragedy of the exploitation.

***********

As the whole world is being driven by the capitalists, multi national companies have wooed other countries to sign the patent law which bared those countries from producing the generic drugs. India until few years ago was a cheap source of generic medicines. African people who could not afford the western pharmaceutical companies medicines had to depend on Indian pharmaceutical companies as a cheap source of supplies for them. Sensing their business loss, India was persuaded to bring in the patent bill. India’s patent law passed in 2005 brought India under the control of World Trade Organization (WTO), which increased the cost of the medicines.

Not just the exploitation of the resources, Africa has become the place of clinical trial for western pharmaceutical companies. Any medicine after research and development has to undergo rigorous testing. This involves testing with the actual patients. Africa has become a place for clinical trial because of its population and the existence of the variety of diseases due to the poor economic condition of the people. Often these clinical trials were executed  compromising fair clinical fractice which is the advocated standard.

So, with all these background in the mind, I don’t see the Pirates of Somalia as “Pirates”. I see them as coast guards of Somalia. As one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter, one man’s pirate is another man’s coast guard

Written by Tamil SASI

Tamil SASI is a popular bilingual blogger who writes on various topics in English and Tamil. You can read his other writings at tamilsasi.com

Filed under: Africa, Business & Economy, Politics, World, , , , , , , , ,

India not a country of doers: Infosys Narayanamurthy

On Coalition:
If we are all individuals who think intelligently, who think dispassionately, who use data and facts to argue, who are patriotic… then how can we be against any policy that makes this a better country; …. So, it is all about petty issues that make our governments less effective. I don’t believe that coalition governments cannot perform. Well, they can. It is possible…

On Ideas and Implementation:
The Indian society is a society of ideas. It is a society that has revered talk. In this society, articulation is mistaken for accomplishment. We are quite satisfied with our voice, with our writings. This is not a society that is focussed on execution. Frankly, the problem is due to our caste system and the dominance of Brahmins in our society for long period. The Brahminical system said my job is to think of the higher worlds. My job is to think of connecting you people with God. I don’t want to do anything that has a relationship with the real world. Now that is a problem that has played havoc with the Indian culture. So, here in this culture, if you do anything with your hands, it is considered less honourable that anything to do with your brain.

On Recession:
When I was small, my father used to give me jaggery and neem on Ugadi day — the New Year day. We would try and throw out neem away and eat only the jaggery. He would not allow it.
He would make us sit in front of him on the floor — we had no furniture then — and he would say the reason why you are eating neem and jaggery with equanimity is because you are saying that in the coming year there will be some good and some not-so-good events, and you will face both these with equanimity.That is one message that our elders have to communicate to the youngsters: that bad times will pass; they will come from time to time, but they will pass.Bad times are the times when we have to show our hard work, our determination and our talent.

On secularism:
When you are on an accelerated growth path, you have to energize the whole country, unify the whole country. You need the efforts of everybody, belonging to every caste, every class. You cannot afford to discriminate against any particular group of individuals, and that is why I believe secularism is important.Secularism is not about forgetting who you are; secularism is about saying I will respect you for what you are and that we will take all decisions without considering what religion you belong to. That is secularism. Secularism is not about not saying I am a Hindu. I am a Hindu, I am proud to be a Hindu, I do my pooja everyday, but the relationship between me and my God is a personal affair at home and it is not something I bring out into the public and I will not use religion as the basis for any decision-making or any discussion.

On Government:
You know I am of the opinion that the primary objective of the government in a country like India is making sure that there is efficient delivery of basic services, like primary education, primary healthcare, nutrition, and shelter to the poor people. I don’t think corporations should expect the government to put money and help them out.

On Physical infrastructure:
You know the record of public private partnership PPP in India has not been very good. I do agree that we need better infrastructure and that we should not put the entire burden on the public exchequer.But if all political parties come together and say whatever contracts are signed with the private parties will be honoured, no matter whether government ‘A’ or ‘B’ is in control. That is needed. That will raise the confidence of the private party that their contract will indeed be honoured and then they can take more risks: they can take huge bank loans, they can put up front money.

Ronin’s comments:

What do you mean we are not a country of doers? How do you think we grew to billion people?

by Ronin

Filed under: Asia, Business & Economy, Culture, ,

Sri Lanka Crisis: It’s the economy, Ladies & Gentlemen

We are at the midst of a great economic meltdown. Several of the so called developed countries have lost more than half of their net capitalization of stock market due to this economical tsunami at the blink of an eye.  

While Trillion dollar economies of USA, U.K, Japan and India are under turmoil, one would wonder what would be the fate of the economy of the tiny South Asian nation Sri Lanka that is waging a genocidal war against its ethnic minority. It is unfortunate that calls for a permanent ceasefire by several nations including Canada, USA, UK and also the UN has fallen on deaf ears.

We are all aware that a war has to be fought not just at the battlefront but also from political and economic fronts. The current Sri Lankan civil war referred by some as the “Eelam war IV” is also being fought from all these fronts. Considering the large population of the Tamils living in countries like USA, Canada, Europe, Singapore, Malaysia and Australia – the Tamils who are collectively campaigning for an immediate ceasefire, have the numeric advantage over the Sinhala masses that back the war mongering regime of the Rajapakse brothers. 

If only those who are in favor of freedom and human dignity can launch a campaign in collaboration with the native population of the respective countries they live in – to boycott “Made in Sri Lanka” products, a strong message – one that cannot be tainted negatively or brushed aside easily, can be sent to the Sri Lankan regime and possibly force an end to this war.

One needs to put his/her sharp mind to work in this “economical battlefront”. Tourism, Tea, Coffee, Garments and Overseas money transfer are some major revenue sources for Sri Lanka. It is this revenue that is boosting the confidence of the Sri Lankan regime to continue the war. Unless it is necessary to support their relatives back in Sri Lanka, one must seize their money transfers to Sri Lanka. Also if possible they should liquidate or pull back their investments from Sri Lanka. This can be done with little effort by every individual. 

Working collectively with other freedom loving members they can take the list of travels agencies that sell tour packages to Sri Lanka and request these agencies “Not to be a part to the genocide” by presenting relevant facts thorough emails and holding peaceful rallies in front of their offices.  

 In your day to day life – when you come across products made in Sri Lanka – either a Tea bag in the grocery store or Garments in the Malls, every individual has the historical responsibility to boycott that product and also communicate not only to Tamils, but to every fellow human on where the money is going. The business’s that deal with Sri Lankan products need to be informed about the “loss of life” that is being caused with every transaction of these products. 

In an informed and responsible society, everyone is a freedom fighter.  Let us all realize how the strength of 1 million+ strong Tamil Diaspora can multiply when they start working with all the freedom loving citizens of the country they live in.

As Bill Clinton used the phrase “It’s the economy, stupid” to defeat George H.W. Bush during the 1992 presidential campaign, although Papa Bush was considered unbeatable because of the foreign policy developments such as the end of the Cold War and the Persian Gulf War. Let us all use the phrase “It’s the economy, Ladies & Gentlemen” to knock down the war mongering Sri Lankan regime from its pursuit of this genocidal war.

Written by Sasikumar 
An engineer by profession, Sasikumar holds double masters degree in Engineering from India and Business Administration from USA. He writes to transform the Indian politics into an issue based one.

Filed under: Asia, Business & Economy, Politics, , , , , , , , , , ,

India’s Car Market – road behind, road ahead

Do you still remember the days when the only cars that were on the Indian roads were the Indian made Ambassador, Premier Padmini (Fiat) and Standard. I still vividly remember the “Be Indian, Buy Indian” slogans painted at the back of every bus and lorry.

Ambassador

Ambassador

Ambassador from Hindustan Motors was undoubtedly the king of the Indian roads back then. Ambassador has remained virtually unchanged for about 30 years. If you visited suburban or rural areas of India, this was the only model that was capable of handling the bad roads (or the no road terrain). With high bumper and the rugged body, Ambassador was certainly capable of taking you anywhere.

Hindustan Motors is one of the oldest Indian car manufacturers in India. Its Ambassador model is based on the Morris Oxford, a British car that dates back to 1954. Founded in 1942 by Mr. B.M. Birla, it was a leader in car sales until the 1980s. It began in Port Okha near Gujarat, and in 1948, moved to Uttarpara, West Bengal.

Premier Padmini

Premier Padmini

In many aspects Ambassador is in par with today’s SUV (Sports Utility Vehicle) models. Premier Padmini had the “white collar” look and was mostly owned by doctors and advocates. However it lacked the aristocratic appeal and only those with a taste for modern simplicity went for it. On the other hand Standard Herald was the choice of those with a taste of their own with a “stay away from mainstream” attitude.

Walchand Hirachand started Premier Automobiles Ltd. (PAL) in 1942. They assembled De Soto and Plymouth cars in 1946 in association with Chrysler from the United States. In 1973, the Premier name was used on their vehicles for the first time.

Standard Herald

Standard Herald

These were the models that made the Indian roads and cities look ancient when compared to foreign roads and cities of the same period. While other country roads have already been flocked by new sleek modern cars, Indians still lived with these old model cars for a long time before the Indian automobile manufactures introduced their next generation models.

The Standard began automobile production in Madras in 1957 making variations of vehicles made in the U.K. by Standard-Triumph. Standard 10 & Standard Herald were one of the popular models in India in the 60’s and 70’s.

Premier 118NE 
Contessa Classic 
Standard 2000

Premier 118NE, Contessa Classic & Standard 2000

Premier introduced the “118NE”. Hindustan Motors introduced the “Contessa Classic”. Both were a breeze and brought the much wanted modern look to the Indian roads. Then came the most modern looking car of the 80’s – The Standard 2000 (a 2-litre version of the Rover SD1) from Standard Motors. It was spacious and had a sports car look. However Standard Motors stopped making the model within two years of launch.

Rumor has it that Tata who was selling imported cars during that period manipulated the market, which led to the model being dropped by Standard Motors. The Standard 2000 was indeed poised to create a wave of excitement in the Indian automobile industry, but met a premature end unfortunately. 

Another revoluation in the Indian automobile industry during the 8o’s – was the joint venture of  Suzuki – Japan that resulted in the launch of Maruti 800, based on the Suzuki Alto kei. Maruti Suzuki 800 was a sleek economy car. Maruti also introduced the Maruti Omni Van which was a big success. The sliding doors offered great convenience and became the choice for people who valued room and convenience over looks.

Maruti 118

Maruti Suzuki 800

However, the Ambassador was still considered the car with “The Class”. If you were to pick up a VIP you would always send an Ambassador as it still retained the rich aristocratic appeal.

Maruti Udyog Limited (MUL) was established in February 1981. The joint venture Maruti Suzuki was owned by the Indian government and Suzuki of Japan. The Indian government held an initial public offering of 25% of the company in June 2003. As of May 10, 2007, Govt. of India sold its complete share to Indian financial institutions. 

 

Fast forward to present:

With India embracing open economy and allowing foreign auto makers in, the rush is yet to settle down. Indian roads are now filled with Japanese, Korean, European and American cars. The Indian Passenger Car market is full of uphill projections and every major auto maker of the world has an eye set on this promising market.

Keystone- a US-based consultancy firm and subsidiary of LaSalle Consulting Associates- forecasted that India will become the world’s third largest automobile market by 2030, behind just China and the US. The size of the Indian vehicle market was forecast to cross 20 million from the one million plus vehicles sold in 2004.

During 2006 and 2007 alone General Motors, Fiat, Honda, Nissan and Hyundai announced Indian investments valued at roughly $1.5 billion.

Tata Motors has tied up with the Punjab National Bank and a host of other PSU’s like Corporation Bank, Central Bank, Bank of India and State Bank of Patiala in preperation for its launch this month of the much awaited Nano – dubbed as the cheapest car of the world. Priced at over one Rs lakh, Tata Motors hopes the Nano will pull in significant volumes from non-metro towns

Polo – another model from Europe’s largest carmaker Volkswagen is to hit Indian roads in January 2010. Jorge Mueller, MD, VW India said “The car fits completely perfect for the Indian conditions. You see it from the shape, from the design, how it looks like, when you take a look at its interior, when you will see in the future equipment, the engines and all that you will see it completely matches with the demands we have in India.”

German luxury car maker Audi, which made its debut in India in 2006, is targeting selling 1,500 cars this year, banking on untapped opportunities in the “compact premium” segment in the country. “We are targeting a 40-50% growth in India over last year, closing the year with 1,500 units,” Audi chairman Rupert Stadler told visiting Indian journalists.  

Today the Indian automobile industry is the tenth largest in the world with an annual production of approximately 2 million units. The list of Indian automobile companies is long: Ashok Leyland, Force Motors Ltd, Hindustan Motors, Mahindra & Mahindra Limited, Maruti Suzuki, Premier Automobiles, REVA & Tata Motors. The list of Multi-national companies in India is even longer: Audi, BMW, Fiat, Ford Motors (collaboration with Mahindra & Mahindra), General Motors, Honda, Hyundai, Renault-Nissan, Mercedes-Benz, Mitsubishi Motors, Škoda & Toyota (joint venture between Toyota Motor Corporation and the Kirloskar Group).

With the recent global economic downturn, India’s passenger-car sales climbed for the first time in five months in February as lower auto-loan rates spurred demand for the hatchbacks of Maruti Suzuki India Ltd., Hyundai Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. Sales rose 22 percent from a year earlier to 115,386, the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers said in a statement this week in New Delhi. Ten of 13 carmakers posted a gain.  

Defenitely the road ahead looks better, clear of obstacles and traffic jams.

References:

Written by Sunderapandyan

Written by Sunderapandyan – Community cheer leader, web developer & innovator – Sunderapandyan is hard to pin down. He writes on South Asian news and issues to the world.

Filed under: Business & Economy, , , , , , , , , , ,

Gandhi’s personal objects bought by Indian tycoon Vijay Mallya

Written by Sunderapandyan.

The five personal objects included the iconic round eye glasses of Mahatma Gandhi

The five personal objects included the iconic round eye glasses of Mahatma Gandhi

Despite the last minute change of mind by the US based James Otis owner of Mahatma Gandhi’s personal objects, the items went under the hammer in New York today (Thusrday Afternoon New York time). Indian bussiness tycoon Vijay Mallya bought the memorabilia items for $1.8 million. Bidding began at $20,000 and rose to the final price within seven minutes. The second highest bid was $1.75 million submitted online from Britain. The US justice department has asked the Antiquorum Auctioneers to hold the lot for two weeks pending a resolution between the new owner, the US and Indian Government. 

Tony Bedhi – a representative for Mallya did the bidding. He later informed that the items would be returned to India for public display. It is not clear though if the items would be handed over to the Indian government. 

It has been reported that confusion prevailed at the Antiquorum Auctioneers. The chairman of Antiquorum Auctioneers Robert Maron announced that despite news that Otis had decided to pull out, the auction would proceed. Shortly afterwards Ravi Batra a lawyer who said he was representing Otis pro bono, entered the auction house and announced that Otis wishes to halt the sale. Within an hour, Batra was escorted out from the auction house by the staff.

Vijay Mallya owns the United Breweries Group and Kingfisher Airlines

Vijay Mallya owns the United Breweries Group and Kingfisher Airlines

The owner James Otis was earlier demanding budgetary increases in India’s spending on the poor in exchange for the memorabilia. New Delhi was irritated with the demands put forward by Mr Otis. Sources said that the government feels Mr Otis cannot dictate terms. Earlier Sant Singh Chatwal an US-Indian businessman had called on the Indian community to join the bid to secure Mahatma Gandhi memorabilia.

Its interesting to note that Mallya had earlier bought the Sword of Tipu Sultan – another item of Indian heritage for Rs 4 crore and brought it back to India.

Written by Sunderapandyan – Community cheer leader, web developer & innovator – Sunderapandyan is hard to pin down. He writes on South Asian news and issues to the world.

Filed under: Business & Economy, Culture, , , , , , , , , ,

Should we ban Using Paper for Newspapers? Use Online News instead

Written by Ronin

Ronin is a Technology Entrepreneur, Parent, Student, avid Reader and a global citizen

This is a presentation I made, recommending online newspapers in US.  I thought I should share it with you. This is a cut and paste from Powerpoint.

Where Is Global Warming?
Shishmaref, an Island town of 600 residents in Alaska, USA. The town has been the winter home of the Inupiat for 4,000 years. But now, Sea is swallowing up one home after another The protective sea ice that used to buffer the village against storms isn’t as massive now — the weather’s been too warm for too long. Shoreline eroding at an average of 10 feet a year

Its already affecting us

Why Should we stop using paper for Newspaper?

Reason 1: Environmental Impact of News Paper Usage

Story 1: A Sunday in Minneapolis
Sunday Edition of Minneapolis Star Tribune
172 Pages. Circulation of 606, 698

Impact? 4,472 trees cut for just one Sunday edition of one newspaper
232,544 trees cut per year for a Sunday Newspaper in Just One city!

Newsprint consumption is 9.2 million tons per year
Average amount of recycled fiber content 35 %
6 million tons of virgin fiber = 72 million trees/year
Newspaper paper usage >  books+ magazine + catalogs
Paper Industry emits the fourth-highest level of greenhouse gas emissions among US  manufacturers. 9% of US manufacturing Co2 emission

Clear cutting- Destruction of Required as well as unrequired trees
UV rays leads to cancer

Reason 2: Paper Media-Wasteful and Uneconomical

Story 2: Washingtonpost.com Success
At a time when newsrooms across the country have empty desks from recent buyouts and layoffs, The newsroom at washingtonpost.com staff numbers here are expanding and profits are growing

Twins where Online Media is thriving (revenues grew by 28%) while Print Media Washington Post is declining (lost 4% of its Print ad revenue)

Online Media
20% of Cost Saved from Newsprint . Energy Saving in Printing and Distribution
4 * Avg Server consumption=  4 * 4,505 KW-hours of electricity per year for 100,000 readers (household uses apprx.10,000 kWh ).

Internet path servers shared between companies. Less Wastage
72% of US population internet accessible users(2008)

69% of 18-54 read online news in fall 2008. More than the 68% adults who read Newspapers.
Online Ad Revenue grew 18.8 percent to $3.2 billion
Print Ad Revenue fell 9.4%  percent $42.2  billion (2007)

Suggestion

Banning using paper in Newspaper Media and instead online news:

Not only an investment for the future

But also economical for the present

Filed under: Business & Economy, Culture, North America, , , ,

Tata’s Nano Car to hit the market in March

Written by Sunderapandyan.

Community cheer leader, leisure sportsman, web developer & innovator – Sunderapandyan is hard to pin down. He writes on South Asian news and issues to the world.

The cheapest car in the world is expected to begin rolling off assembly lines March 23, seven months behind schedule. India’s tiny Tata Nano is priced at 100,000-rupee ($2,005)  making it the most affordable four wheeler to the large middle class population of the country.

Bookings for the Nano is expected to start in the second week of April. Tata Nano car was first unveiled at the auto expo in Delhi on January 10, 2008. Since then the car has evoked an unprecedented interest in India. The official website of Tata Nano has recorded over 30 million hits in the past one year and at the same time over 6,000 interest groups and communities have been created.

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Barack Obama says No more tax sops for outsourcing firms – its significance

Written by Sabapathy Narayanan.

A consultant specializing in services, products & marketing – Sabapathy is a rainmaker for technology and telecommunication start-ups. Sabapathy writes on software trends, issues, producteering and services.

US president Barack Obama has served notice that he would end the tax breaks for corporations that ship jobs abroad

US president Barack Obama has served notice that he would end the tax breaks for corporations that ship jobs abroad

I can understand Obama’s standpoint. It is the trade union folks who campaigned so very effectively for Obama and they are to be protected, but it goes against all the principles and policies that America has stood for all these years. America has always been a proponent of free enterprise and globalization. After all, it is a country built by immigrants by and large. All of this is changing because of the protectionist attitude showcased now.

Sample these comments from Marc Faber on the US economy.

“The federal government is sending each of us a $600 rebate.
If we spend that money at Wal-Mart, the money goes to China.
If we spend it on gasoline it goes to the Arabs.
If we buy a computer it will go to India.
If we purchase fruit and vegetables it will go to Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala.
If we purchase a good car it will go to Germany.
If we purchase useless crap it will go to Taiwan and none of it will help the American economy.
The only way to keep that money here at home is to spend it on prostitutes and beer, since these are the only products still produced in US.
I’ve been doing my part.”

These are really extraordinary times for the Americans as well as the President but these cutbacks on tax sops are an extreme step. This is more a populist move that we are used to in Indian politics. Let us dwell on how this affects Indian corporations. I would say that the effect will be huge, because close to 50% of the Indian service exporters revenue comes from the US and it is 50% of $100 billion economy that we are talking about and the impact necessarily will be huge.

The good thing is that the existing contracts don’t get affected, but if transactions don’t increase, then transactions cease to exist over a period of time. Fortunately, this doesn’t affect import of finished goods or this is what I assume it is, lest Americans will find it difficult to manage considering the luxuries that they are used to.

Let us look at how things will evolve assuming US goes ahead with this proposed cut back on outsourcing.

  • Firstly, it is unfair to all the US MNCs for their profitability will get affected considerably. Every additional dollar that US makes should invariably contribute towards more jobs in their country. I don’t know if I am right here.
  • Assuming that they cancel issuing work permits to skilled resources, then those jobs will also go to Americans. Mind you, these are expensive resources and it would affect profitability. In due course of time, there will be more work than the number of people available to do them even at a premium.
  • There will not be an alternative for the US but to outsource again. By then, all these companies in developing economies that are dependent on US today, would have shed their baggage and would have moved their business elsewhere. Hence their services will also be available only at a premium and the cycle will continue.
  • Additionally, most products made in the US don’t get consumed in the US and close to 90% of it gets exported. US definitely is not a self sustaining economy. Americans are not used to living frugally(relatively), whereas the developing countries or the so-called third world countries have seen difficult times in the past and will manage.
  • If the majority of global population, which is India and China, decide to go the Gandhian way, “Videshi Chhodo, Swadeshi Apnao” (Shed foreign, Embrace local) , then the US economy will get into further recession and their economy will be in doom, but they would get to keep their jobs.

Considering all these implications and the impact that it is going to have on the Indian service sector, it would be wise for us to wait and get to see the full account of what this really means before looking at alternatives. There will be heavy lobbying that will happen in the US as well and the industries there will have to impress upon their government to allow things to get stabilized, instead of pushing them deeper into trouble.

Filed under: Business & Economy, , , , , , , , , ,

Commercialization of Valentines day

Written by Ronin

As a marketer, I am taught to identify opportunities to make money, where there is none. I am taught to follow peoples emotions, behavior and expectations.

Commercial enterprises make money out of every occasions in peoples life-birth, love, death, religious holidays. Avoiding celebration of this commercialization also means avoiding the celebration of the occasions. Are n’t we more susceptible to the manipulation of the marketers, if we avoid celebrating celebrations , just to thumb our nose at the marketers?

Filed under: Business & Economy, Culture

Slum Dog rides on White Tiger

Written by Malarthamil

Malarthamil is a civil engineer and writer-poet inspired by Thirukkural.

The Purchase of English cricketers Kevin Pietersen and Andrew Flintoff for 1.55 million dollars each, in the bid for IPL cricket, may project outlandish scenario of erstwhile slaves buying their former masters . Already Forbes lists four Indians among the top ten billionaires of the world and the most number of Billionaires in Asia are living in India. But the portrayal of India by Arvind Adiga and Danny Boyle contrast these facts. Strange, the world is fed with misleading facts on big bellies in the media and left to see the reality of small bellies in fiction works.

Who thinks about 390 million Indian people living with a paltry earning of just Rs.20 ( $0.20 )a day? No one knows because their faces are unfit for repeat telecast. India is placed at 127 in Human Development Index, when compared to China at 85 and Sri Lanka at 93 out of the total 177 countries surveyed by United Nations. Millions of poor hungry Indians went to bed for another sleepless night while their fortunate fellow citizens visited Mangalore pub to take a kick from fundamentalist thugs.

What we have done to eradicate Hunger if not Poverty so far from this entire planet??

From the curse of an ancient sage,

“If some must beg and live
Let the creator himself beg and die.”

To the fury of a modern poet,

“If even a single man starves
We will destroy the world.”

our civilization has shamelessly traveled about 2000 years while millions perished for want of food. As an individual many share their food as a religious duty but the Governments have miserably failed in their responsibility to achieve Economic Justice. Universally we have evolved the Government as a system of sharing the wealth gained through individual labor. Therefore only the Governments of this world should have a policy and plan to wipe out Hunger.

At present the UN agencies rush to help only when the poor Governments fail due to famine or internal disturbances. United Nations have not evolved to run a world Government for sharing the wealth to address the hunger. Eradicating extreme poverty and hunger is the first of the eight millennium goals set by United Nations. There may be many schemes to achieve this goal in Africa and Asia, but the unique experience in the south Indian state of Tamil Nadu. calls for splitting this goal into two, tackling Hunger first and Poverty next.

It started in 1959 when the Government of Tamilnadu provided free lunch to the students in the Primary schools run by local government mainly to protect children from class room hunger. In 1982 it was extended to all the enrolled children of the state in Government schools under nutritious meal scheme. Later, with the inclusion of free eggs thrice a week, the scheme is still continuing indicating that eradicating poverty is not yet achieved. After caring for young ones, the Government turned to adults by providing heavy subsidy on the rice, the staple food grain of south Indians, distributed to the poor families through Public Distribution System(PDS)

In 2006 the price for this rice was drastically reduced to just Rs.2 per kg .And in 2008 it was further reduced to Rs.1 per kg. A middle class family spends Rs.400 to 800 for 20 kg of quality rice whereas a family living below poverty line ( BPL) needs only Rs.20 for 20 kg. per month. Such schemes are now adopted by other states of India and in other countries.

If the Government of India brings a national scheme for free grains of at least 10 kg per BPL family, it could be a good movement towards food security to ensure that every citizen is fed and freed from hunger first since eradication of poverty is not to be achieved in near future. We hope the billionaires are not inhuman and they will show their responsibility by sharing the finance.

. “Food for all” should no more be a dream. Back to the poetic words cited, there is indication of a connection between the food and the end of the God or World. We should only wish our future generations live long in the endless world along with or without God.

goal1_lg1

Filed under: Business & Economy, Culture, Entertainment, Politics, Sports, World, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Can A Global Economy Ever Work?

Written by NÈF Worldwide

NÈF Worldwide is a movement of like-minded individuals, committed to pursuing abundant life for all. NÈF Worldwide posts at Kalugu are by Richard, Founder and Lead Antagonist of NÈF.

 

 

04_28_50-us-dollar-bills_web

 

We’ve had some discussion on here about the merits – or lack thereof – of capitalism in a global economy. I continue to argue that capitalism, in it’s truest sense, cannot work in a global economy, which seems to be something slowly though quietly acknowledged by the Obama-led government as he pushes for less international purchases and more “buy American” thinking.

I thought it might be interesting to note, for the sake of the discussion, how much money is spent on an international level when it comes to the non-essential items that drive a capitalist-based economy. The following is a list of the big spenders, and how they rank on a global scale (listed in Billions of US Dollars):

  • The United States: $2,135.3
  • Japan: $532.3
  • The United Kingdom: $497.4
  • Germany $471.7
  • France $344.1
  • China $230.3
  • Canada $215.4
  • Russia $190.4
  • India $79.1

Now, if we were to look at those same numbers, based on expenditure per person, remembering that this is for non-essential items, the list looks like this:

  • The United Kingdom: $8,290
  • Canada: $7,180
  • The United States: $7,118
  • Germany: $5,896
  •  France: $5,294
  • Japan: $4,095
  • Russia: $1,360
  • China: $172
  • India: $69

Those last two numbers should scream out at you. The two largest population bases in the world collectively spend less than $150/per person on the items that tend to drive an economy upward.

It was argued on an earlier post, that China and India will experience 22% growth (I’m assuming annually), whereas, countries like the US will experience 2.5% (quoting James Wolfensohn). Assuming the statement is correct, which I don’t,  in 40 years the expenditures by country would look like (again listed in Billions of US Dollars):

  • China: $655,673 
  •  India: $225,200
  • The United States: $5,781

Now, if you happen to be Chinese or Indian, that should make you feel great, except it’s not plausible. In order for the economy to grow at such an astronomical rate there would have to be:

  • an increase of expendable income
  • a major shift in values when it comes to money and its use
  • a population increase, similar to what The US has experienced since the Great Depression

Those of you from India (or China, or any Asian country that fits the scenario), allow me to ask:

If  you can imagine a dramatic increase in expendable income (income rises faster than the rate of inflation), can you also imagine the paradigm value shift required to spend money so freely or a population increase that would leave your country at 2.48 billion residents?

One of the strongest, growing economies in the world today is Cuba, despite some of it’s residents  experiencing poverty and the US embargo. This is openly acknowledged by the US government. How did this happen? It’s simple: No exploitation of it’s resources by outsiders. Our products for our people first.

There are others, mostly in South America and mostly led by Hugo Chavez that are adopting this philosophy. It appears, despite American criticism of those in the Chavez camp, that Obama is adopting a similar mindset. Perhaps it is the way forward for everyone.

Anyway, by this point I’ve inundated you with stats and numbers, and I’d really like to understand how Asia expects to grow at the rate of 22% without westerners buying their manufactured goods, which they will no longer  be able to do, since they are out of work due to the global economy. The numbers just don’t support the prediction of explosive global growth.

Capitalism might work for everyone, if we choose to only sell our products at home… but I’m still working on a better solution, because 9 countries collectively spending 4.7 trillion dollars on non-essential goods in the same year that 11 million children under the age of five died of preventable causes, is not a just world. How can one person (UK) spend more than $8,000 on things he did not need, knowing his brothers and sisters are in great need. 

Capitalism doesn’t work, because at worst it exploits and at best it turns a blind eye to suffering. The numbers support that truth.

 

Stats were based on the calendar year 2007 and taken from:

The New York Times

Wikipedia

Filed under: Africa, Asia, Business & Economy, Culture, Europe, North America, Politics, World

Floating Off The Coast of Freedom

Richard - www.nefworldwide.comBefore I start, allow me to say what an honor it is to have been invited to participate at Kalugu. Born, raised, and living in Canada, I view myself as a citizen of what is increasingly becoming a borderless world. Having said that, I also recognize that having not lived a single day in Asia, it is hard for me  to speak authoritatively on current events there, and will instead attempt to hold myself to commentary from a western perspective when blogging here, in the hopes of spurring on respect-filled dialogue. Thanks for having me… thanks for reading… thanks in advance for your feedback. – Richard (NÈF Worldwide)

Floating Off The Coast of Freedom

Two men, suspected to be Myanmar refugees, were found floating in a cooler off of the coast of Australia this week. Having survived afloat for 25 days on nothing more than rainwater and bird droppings, these desperate men got me to thinking of an old story found in the ancient Jewish texts.

The story is told of two lepers, living in a city under siege. The city and its people have found itself in such dire circumstances that donkey dung is an edible commodity. The lepers, realizing that they can die of starvation or die at the hands of the enemy outside their gates, opt for the kindness of the enemy, and march into the army’s camp.

Whether it be a miracle or a coincidence or a combination of the two, the army flees in such haste that everything is left behind. The lepers, starving only moments earlier, now begin to dine in high fashion with all the spoils of a feast spread at their feet.

And then, somewhere in their gluttony, they realize that a few hundred yards away thousands of people are starving without knowledge of the freedom that now exists. Despite the treatment they have faced from these same people during their time of sickness, they announce freedom for all and share the bounty that has been left for their pleasure. 

And so I wonder: Will Asia be that way?

As tech jobs and manufacturing jobs leave the shores of the west for India, China, Pakistan, and other trained, prepared, and eager people groups, there will be some who find themselves no longer struggling, but prospering in new found economic freedom, while others, just a few hundred yards away, continue to starve in ignorance.

So, will the newly prosperous Asian follow the lead of the wealthy that came before him, ignoring the plight of others, exploiting them when he can, and seeking to get as wealthy as possible?

or

Will Asia teach the rest of us a lesson? Will you learn from our mistakes and the generosity of a few ancient lepers, and find a way for abundance to be shared by all? 

I don’t believe that capitalism, in it’s truest form, can ever work because it requires that some be exploited for the good of one. I believe there is a better way for us all. I believe you can show it to us, if you choose to avoid the greed of human nature and learn to share the wealth.

Don’t believe the propaganda… the world doesn’t have to stay broken.

Filed under: Business & Economy, World, , , , , , ,